And There Is No One Just Like Me

I took a yoga class last night and our teacher gave a dharma talk (which is a speech sometimes given at the start of class) that truly resonated with me. It is common during the Thanksgiving holiday that we offer gratitude for the friends and family in our life, our continued health, love and support from others, etc. However, as this yoga teacher mentioned in her talk — we often neglect thanking ourselves.

We forget to look in the mirror and see all that we have personally accomplished and how unique each and everyone one of us are to this world. Even with the billions of people who exist, there is no one just like you.

And there is no one just like me.

This is a concept that I have often had trouble understanding and accepting as I always wanted to be like everyone else. I was never confident in my unique abilities and always found ways to ignore rather than embrace. I always wanted to fit in, no matter how young or old. And there is nothing wrong with that as I am sure anyone reading this can understand the notion of not wanting to be different.

Honestly, it is scary to be different.

It is such a strange feeling to step outside your comfort zone because you know that your talents and skills aren’t being properly utilized. But in the end, it should make you happy to do what you are meant to do.

At least, that is what I am learning now.

It has been a long road to get where I am today. It has been intimidating and worrisome to wonder what other people think of me — specifically, what other men think of me. Sure, I could have opted to go down the business route (which was actually my first major in undergrad) but would I be happy?

Doubtful.

I would definitely have a lot more money but as I have learned from others — money does not equal happiness.

Embracing my uniqueness and doing what I love has taken me 35 years to admit. I am proud that I work with young children. I am proud that I can serve as a male role model for children lacking a central-male figure in their household.

I am thankful that I can let all of my insecurities go because I finally recognize what I truly love.

I am thankful for men like Fred Rogers, Dr. Seuss, and Jim Henson who came before me to show that working and creating education and entertainment for children is truly remarkable.

I am thankful for wanting to finally create my own path knowing what these men have accomplished and the millions of children’s hearts and minds they have touched in the process.

I am thankful for finally being me.

BY GRANT HENRY